Does Your Business Use “Creative” Job Titles?

A recent survey conducted by Twitter suggests that companies should consider cutting from their vocabulary cringe-worthy job titles for marketing, digital, social media and other positions. They started appearing when the internet bubble was exploding, went out of favor for a while, but have recently been coming back as more companies strive for a culture of innovation and creativity.

Some of these titles that exist include the following (and there are thousands more):

  • Social Media (or Sales or Digital or Marketing, etc.) Ninja
  • Marketing (or Sales or Digital or Social Media, etc.) Rock Star
  • Digital (or Sales or Social Media or Marketing, etc.) Guru
  • Director of First Impressions
  • Digital Prophet
  • Chief Curator
  • Ambassador of Buzz
  • Chief Cheerleader

These kinds of creative titles, while seemingly innocent and fun, can actually have detrimental effects on one’s professional persona. 90% of Twitter’s survey respondents felt these novel job titles devalue the person and cause others to take them less seriously. Basically. when someone works to showcase themselves as an expert in a particular area, but has a so-called, clever title, there’s a major disconnect. In addition, some of these are getting overused. For instance, Hootsuite says there are at least 21,000 people on Twitter who show their title as “Social Media Ninja.”

For some companies however, more creative titles may work, as it comes down to corporate culture and communicating a clear role for an organization. While the list of cons are many, there are three main positives when dealing with imaginative job titles: 1) It stands out; 2) It serves to strike up a conversation and 3) It can help communicate a company’s corporate culture. For example, who wouldn’t want a title called Genius (Apple’s title for their service techs)? What do you think? Let us know by leaving a comment below.

 

 

 

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Posted in Business Culture, Market Research, Multichannel Marketing, Research

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